Call us

Tool Kit For A Parent Of A Child In Middle Childhood

Order this Paper

Tool Kit For A Parent Of A Child In Middle Childhood Overview Create a 6–8-page “tool kit” for a parent of a child in middle childhood, including specific situational examples for behavior modification and sample dialog for the parent to use for each situation.

Note: Child development occurs in a specific sequence. Therefore, the assessments in this course are presented in sequence and must be completed in order. Parents often request coaching to help them handle a child’s behavior. This authentic assessment could be adapted for use in many professional situations. The purpose is to practice developing educational aids that are grounded in child development theory but are presented in a manner that is accessible and useful in many child advocacy situations.

By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assessment criteria:

Competency 2: Assess children’s evolving needs from infancy to adolescence. Assess the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive needs of a specific child during the period of middle childhood. Apply evidence-based intervention strategies to develop parent education materials for issues, across domains.

Competency 3: Evaluate the influences of family, society, and culture on child development. Evaluate the influence of family, society, and culture that impact a specific child’s development outcomes during the period of middle childhood.

Competency 4: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for members of the psychological professions. Use appropriate language and visuals to aid comprehension. Write clearly and succinctly, with no grammatical errors. Competency Map Check Your ProgressUse this online tool to track your performance and progress through your course. Context As every parent can attest, no child comes into this world with a how-to guide. “Normal” development and behavior are relative terms and moving targets, based on personality, age, and stage of development. Helping parents, schools, and families understand and navigate Details Attempt 1

. Professionals hear the plea, “Tell me what to do when such-and-such happens,” on a regular basis. Most people think that discipline is synonymous with punishment. However, “discipline” means to teach with love. Educating parents to constructively handle problem behaviors with constructive, positive discipline methods (teaching with love) gives them the support and confidence to effectively manage negative behaviors with calm confidence. The child benefits from an improved relationship with the parent, which encourages positive behaviors. As a professional, it is important to provide developmentally age appropriate information for parents, so they understand what is considered “normal” behavior, or behavior that deviates from that. They will need psychoeducation and information about strategies to effectively manage behaviors in a way that both the parents and children feel good about. For example, rather than implement punishments, discuss options of motivating rewards children could acquire. Questions to Consider To deepen your understanding, you are encouraged to consider the questions below and discuss them with a fellow learner, a work associate, an interested friend, or a member of the business community. How does family, culture, or society impact child development? What factors do you have to consider when educating parents about child development? How do you work with a family whose belief system is completely opposite of your own in order to achieve a positive outcome for the child? How does personal culture and background affect one’s belief system? Resources Required Resources The following resource is required to complete the assessment. Capella Multimedia Click the link provided below to view the following multimedia piece. Child Psychology Case Study Profiles: Jeremiah | Transcript. Suggested Resources The following optional resources are provided to support you in completing the assessment or to provide a helpful context. For additional resources, refer to the Research Resources and Supplemental Resources in the left navigation menu of your courseroom. Capella Multimedia Click the links provided below to view the following multimedia piece: Child Psychology Resources | Transcript. Library Resources The following e-books or articles from the Capella University Library are linked directly in this course

Berry, D., & O’Connor, E. (2010). Behavioral risk, teacher–child relationships, and social skill development across middle childhood: A child-by-environment analysis of change. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 31(1), 1–14. Knight, R. (2011). Fragmentation, fluidity, and transformation: Nonlinear development in middle childhood. The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 65, 19–47. Nuttall, C., & Woods, K. (2013). Effective intervention for school refusal behaviour. Educational Psychology in Practice, 29(4), 347–366. Course Library Guide A Capella University library guide has been created specifically for your use in this course. You are encouraged to refer to the resources in the PSY-FP7220 – Child Psychology Library Guide to help direct your research. Internet Resources Access the following resources by clicking the links provided. Please note that URLs change frequently. Permissions for the following links have been either granted or deemed appropriate for educational use at the time of course publication. National Institutes of Health, U.S. Library of Medicine. (n.d.). MedlinePlus: Child development. Retrieved from https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/childdevelopment.html Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (n.d.). Child development. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/childdevelopment/ Child Development Center. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://childdevcenter.org/ Bookstore Resources The resources listed below are relevant to the topics and assessments in this course and are not required. Unless noted otherwise, these materials are available for purchase from the Capella University Bookstore. When searching the bookstore, be sure to look for the Course ID with the specific –FP (FlexPath) course designation. Berk, L. E. (2012). Infants, children, and adolescents (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon. American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Assessment Instructions Note: Child development occurs in a specific sequence. Therefore, the assessments in this course are presented in sequence and must be completed in order. Assume you work in an elementary school as a school and family advocate. Jeremiah’s mother is requesting services for issues at home and at school. She is at her wits’ end and does not think she can handle Jeremiah’s behavioral issues much longer. You must review Jeremiah’s school file and educate his mother about constructive ways to address his behavior issues at home and at school. To prepare for this assessment, view the media piece, Child Psychology Case Study Profiles: Jeremiah, linked in the Resources under the Required Resources heading. Once you have viewed Jeremiah’s case study, develop a 6–8-page “tool kit” for Jeremiah’s mother that includes specific situational examples for strategies and sample dialog for her to use for each situation. Your tool kit should include the following: Provide a brief explanation of the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive needs of Jeremiah during the period of middle childhood (1 page).

Use bullet points, phrases, and visuals to aid understanding. Provide a brief explanation about how the factors of family, society, and culture impact Jeremiah’s development outcomes during the period of middle childhood (1 page). Use bullet points, phrases, and visuals to aid understanding. Apply evidence-based intervention strategies to develop parent education materials for issues across domains. Develop one sample “problem behavior” scenario that might be typical for Jeremiah in school, and explain how his mother should address it with him (2–3 pages). Include suggested parental behaviors or actions in response to situations in school or home. Explain (briefly) how the response to a situation affects the parent-child relationship and Jeremiah’s developmental needs. Develop one sample “problem behavior” scenario that might be typical for Jeremiah at home, and explain how his mother should address it with him (2–3 pages). Include suggested parental behaviors or actions in response to situations in school or home. Explain (briefly) how the response to a situation affects the parent-child relationship and Jeremiah’s developmental needs. Use appropriate, easy-to-understand language. Additional Requirements Do not write this tool kit in APA format, as it must be comprehensible to someone who is not trained in child development. This assessment is not an academic paper, although you must draw on academic skills and knowledge to create it. Include in-text citations as appropriate and a references page at the end. Use bullet points, phrases, and visuals to aid understanding. Your assessment should be 6–8 pages. Tool Kit for a Parent of a Child in Middle Childhood Scoring Guide View Scoring Guide Use the scoring guide to enhance your learning. How to use the scoring guide [U04a1] Tool Kit For A Parent Of A Child In Middle Childhood Create a 6–8-page “tool kit” for a parent of a child in middle childhood, including specific situational examples for behavior modification and sample dialog for the parent to use for each situation. Submit Assessment This button will take you to the next available assessment attempt tab, where you will be able to submit your assessment.

Order this Paper

Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.

Powered by WordPress | Designed by: Premium WordPress Themes | Thanks to Themes Gallery, Bromoney and Wordpress Themes